Seniors: Preparing For Your First Bike Ride in Awhile

You have narrowed your bicycle options to a couple of models that you think will work for you. You are preparing to make a purchase.

How Do I Want To Ride?

Consider the primary purpose for which you will use your bike.

A commuter bike may be suitable for general recreation and exercise, and will probably be less expensive than a bike that offers multiple gearing options.

If you intend to ride your bike on a variety of surfaces, you will probably want to consider a bike that has 3 or 7 speeds.

This type of bike may add a little bit to the price tag, but features like multiple gears and front suspension can make or break your ride on hills and over bumps.

The added comfort and safety are probably worth the slight price increment.

Basic Maintenance

You will probably want to consider the level of assembly required concerning your level of skill with bike maintenance and repairs.

Bikes that are not pre-assembled or that have more moving parts often are not a problem for riders who are repair-savvy.

If you don’t have experience in making bike repairs and adjustments, you may want to consider purchasing a bike that is at least 85 percent pre-assembled.

Some bikes come with a set of generic instructions that are not model-specific. These instructions are often complicated for riders to figure out.
You may want to verify the relevance of the included instructions if you think this might be an issue when you attempt to assemble your new bike.

A Word About Sizing

Proper sizing ensures an optimal fit and makes it easy for you to ride your bike without straining.

Correct sizing is also vital for safety, allowing you to dismount in an emergency quickly.

If your bike is sized correctly sized, you should be able to stand astride the bicycle with both feet flat on the ground.

You can verify your sizing choice by consulting the manufacturer’s sizing charts.

If your height spans two different sizes, you can choose the larger size and adjust it for a proper fit. Another approach is to test both sizes to determine which feels like a better fit.

No Pain Is Your Gain

If you do regular physical activity, you may need a little more time.

To condition your body for rides that become increasingly more challenging as you gain riding experience and increase your muscle tone.

Stretching before you exercise warms your muscles, preventing strains and tears.

Here is a great article that describes ten stretches you can do to warm up before you begin your ride. (2)

Stretching after your ride is an excellent way to cool down and to prevent injury as your body returns to its normal state.

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From award-winning Texas author Cynthia Leal Massey.

2 thoughts on “Seniors: Preparing For Your First Bike Ride in Awhile

  1. Thank you for the post! Spring IS coming

    Live in a hilly area or windy area consider a electric assist bike. It will take the edge off the strain in wind or hills. Assists keeping heart rate consistent to meet goals

    Another good option is a E Bike fat tire bike to take all terrains and condition. Even winter

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The Hill I live on is 9.85°, so for every 115 feet of run, is 20 feet of rise (It takes me 60 Steps to travel that distance). I cannot recall if I have seen anyone pedaling up the street, but recently, an older man, on an Electric Assist Bike made it up the hill by tacking left and right significantly (you have to be vigilant for cars) and making less forward progress as a result, but he made it up the hill without stopping.

      Good tips on the E-Bike and Tires.

      Liked by 1 person

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