Lessons From 1970s Long Gas Rationing Lines We Should Pay Attention to Today

GasBuddy recently forecasted the national average for gasoline at the pump will rise to $3.41 a gallon in 2022, up from $3.02 a gallon in 2021.

Energy Information Administration (EIA) last week predicted gas will be up to $3.79 in 2022.

White House Resident Joe Biden, on Day One decided to rescind the permit for the Keystone XL Pipeline.

Under President Donald J. Trump’s first term, gas prices were close to $1.20 less than Biden’s first year in office. For the first time in history, Americans were not energy dependent on foreign oil.

Today, US pipeline capacity is sitting around 50%.

“We could see a national average that flirts with, or in a worst-case scenario, potentially exceeds $4 a gallon,” said Patrick De Haan, head of petroleum analysis at GasBuddy, the leading app that tracks fuel prices, demand and outages.

Baby Boomers have not forgotten the amplified inflationary pressures American families grappled with during the 1970s and 1980s. With Biden in control, all analysts (except for those in government and mainstream media) indicate we will soon be living with the biggest price spikes in nearly 40 years.

Many of us experienced first-hand the rationing, restrictions and long lines of President Jimmy Carter’s decisions. It was devastating and did not set too well with most Americans when Carter, discussing high home-heating oil prices, encouraged us to wear a sweater and turn down the thermostat.

Singer Jerry Reed’s new recording was entitled “The Crude Oil Blues.” Other songs hitting the airwaves and record stores were “Get That Gasoline Blues,” by NRBQ and “Where Have All the Gas Pumps Gone To?”

Just as it was with Carter, citizens today see in Biden as someone not on their side of the fight.

1970s Remembered

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From award-winning Texas author Cynthia Leal Massey.

8 thoughts on “Lessons From 1970s Long Gas Rationing Lines We Should Pay Attention to Today

  1. I remember this; was at ORU at the time. Mr, Mumble, Jimmy Carter, so hopeless, made us start to feel guilty for Americans being so blessed. Wear a sweater, turn down the thermostat, my mother did exactly that, in a cold Massachusetts winter. And the first tiny trucks and cars started to appear, so we wouldn’t use too much gas. It was the beginning of the Socialism attempt to truly demoralize America, to make us ashamed of being great.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. The 1st time I saw gas above .99 cents was in July 1979 on IH-10 in New Mexico on a roadtrip. I had to get out of the truck to take a picture. They had to put a poster over their 2 digit gas sign.
      In 2005, I recall being mad because gas was $2.05 a gallon. It was again in New Mexico. Took family in an RV trip from Texas to Colorado.

      Liked by 3 people

  2. If the 2022 and 2024 Elections are not the end of the democrat party, they will be the end of America.

    Democrats are not the Working Man’s Party. I worked a Working Man’s Job, in Heavy Industry, for 25+ years. The absolute worst years employment wise was during the obama administration. In a plant that was 100% democrat in opinion, and tolerance for opinion, in 2016, I could not find a single person (in well over 1000 people) voting for hillary clinton. In truth, some hated Trump and clinton, but those people said they were not going to vote. Pro-Trump Bumper Stickers and Graffiti remained unmolested. Never in history of my employment there was that remotely possible.

    Vote as if your country depended on it, because it does. Most democrats must go, and RHINOs too.

    Liked by 2 people

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