Modern Day Patriots Are Preparing For Voter Fraud Across the United States

Stopping Status Quo of Election Crime

We refuse to be cheated.”

The wise and common American patriot is not getting their news from mainstream media anymore. Just as patriots of the American Revolution they learned by word of mouth.

Not unlike those of the 1770’s, men and women today are meeting in local restaurants, pubs, living rooms, rallies, library meeting rooms and community centers across the United States planning their ideas and actions to preserve freedom, liberty and integrity —In God We Trust.

The 2020 stolen presidential election has resulted in more Americans preparing for future elections.

🔹Citizen patriots are forming and making preparations to monitor and document (video, photos, record and report) any suspect activities before, during and after elections.

🔹Locations, operatives, parking and delivery areas that will be monitored include: voting boxes, ballot printing companies, voting tabulation centers, offices of candidates or political figures with a history of ballot harvesting and election fraud.

GEORGIA

“We cannot trust our own Governor (Kemp) and Secretary of State (Raffensperger),” a Georgia man, who is working with various statewide citizens to prepare for 2024. “We will do trial runs and monitor in 2022 to gain knowledge and learn. Our own neighbors and communities will report the real news and we can act in real time.”

The Georgia father met his fellow patriots at a community Little League meeting last Spring.

“Oh, it’s not hard to organize because patriots are everywhere,” he noted. “VFW halls, PTAs, community gatherings and meetings, the after meeting talk all centers on saving the country. It’s universal.”

“The challenge is not getting people to participate and be involved,” it is strategizing our safety as we monitor the targeted locations. Sometimes this means going a county or two over.”

“Oh, we know this is not going on in just Fulton County and Georgia,” we are learning how to combat election crimes from other states too. The intent is to never rely on politicians, news media and other operatives. They cheat, steal and lie. They are the Big Lie.”

“I wouldn’t want to be a Mule with a handful of ballots with us around,” he noted. “We are serious. We trust ourselves. We don’t (trust) politicans, newscasters, postal workers, printing companies and bought out police chiefs. We refuse to be cheated.”

ARIZONA

“It’s not going to happen here again,” a retired Air Force veteran from Mesa, Arizona promised. “We know we were cheated. There is no way in hell Biden won in Arizona.”

“Hell, we had a 90 mile ring around Phoenix full of Trump supporters before the (2020) election,” he said. “We are getting my volunteer patriots more than willing: motorcycle clubs, boating organizations–remember the giant boat parades? They haven’t gone anywhere. “

“We have police, fire, nurses, coaches, truckers, carpenters, plumbers, ex-military…you name it, we have it and we will be ready,” he continued. “Yes, we are the modern day patriot and we are here to save our country.”

“We are organizing and focus on the cheaters,” he noted. “From the high offices of the governor and attorney general, to the ballot printing company here, to scumbag election officials, to mules, we will document, prevent and stop them in the act.”

TEXAS

“In the Valley, we are working at the specific precinct levels to catch cheaters,” a born and raised 54 year old woman from the McAllen, Texas revealed. “Politics is changing here on the border. Uncles and aunts and cousins and others who have been active ballot harvesters are changing their tune. Yes, There is money to be made in being a coyote or mule, but it is hurting us. Crime and gas and groceries and illegals are bad. We have to stop it. We are determined.”

In Texas, the Office of Attorney General Ken Paxton has prosecuted 534 cases of election fraud from 2005 through June 1, 2022. Since 2020, cases have tripled.

So what does one do if they suspect or know of voter and election fraud? It appears in some jurisdictions there are particularly high levels of mistrust with government and volunteer entities.

Those organizing now are:

1. Working to vote George Soros Owned and/or other crooked District Attorneys out of office.

2. Voting honest and vetted DAs, sheriffs, attorney generals, secretaries of state in (both state and local levels)..

3. Doing the homework to vet the responses and integrity of other local officials and workers: sheriff and police offices, postal workers, Non-Government Organizations (NGOs), and especially mules,etc.

State and Federal Resources

Even if you have doubts about some organizations, offices, and individuals in government, it is important to at least report suspected elections crimes to at least establish the documentation and record. Future law cases and controversies could depend on it.

Please Support These American Owned Businesses

___________________________

Get Your Natural Vitamins A & D from the Sea!

CLICK HERE for GOOD HEALTH!
CLICK HERE for GOOD HEALTH!

___________________________

Now Available CLICK Here!
From award-winning Texas author Cynthia Leal Massey.

Americans Taking Freedom by the Horns Supporting Truckers Growing Convoy to DC

Texas trucker Joe Buttons honked at his Oklahoma cousins waving flags and banners above as he drove his rig under a large group of supporters this weekend.

“I could spot them in the crowd up there and heared them loud and clear,” Buttons said. “On the cell (phone) they told me how proud they were of me–all of us. We just thank everybody for lining the streets and overpasses. It’s like patriotism is back.”

One of his relatives told him later they counted 688 18-wheelers “and hundreds of cars, vans, pickups, RVs, and occasionally a motorcycle or two.”

“Everybody asks how many trucks are in the convoy,” Buttons offered. “Hell, I don’t know because it changes so much.”

He explained that some trucks join them on their way east and “then a few that leave us after a few hours. There is a constant flow of families and everybody driving beside us, honking their horns and wishing us luck.”

“We see everybody from every color and every age,” he continued. “It just makes us feel good. It tells us they are on our side of freedom, no matter your age or sex or whatever. We are all Americans—together.”

“They said, with a drone and people on the overpasses counting, it looks like we are up to over 600 trucks and at least that many more of cars and all,” Buttons said. One thing we know for sure–it’s growing and it’s growing fast.”

“When they say ‘the convoy,’ it’s not about just one line of trucks going to Washington,” he explained. “There’s more than one route. We have tributaries of highways leading the charge, the convoys will all meet up.”

“We heard someone say if they could measure all of these trains (vehicles on highways), single file and add them up, right now it would be about 65 miles long.”

While national mainstream media ignores, downplays or distorts news of the convoy, local, social media and independent coverage is strong.

Please Support These American Owned Businesses

___________________________

Get Your Natural Vitamins A & D from the Sea!

CLICK HERE for GOOD HEALTH!
CLICK HERE for GOOD HEALTH!

___________________________

Now Available CLICK Here!
From award-winning Texas author Cynthia Leal Massey.

Goettle HVAC and Plumbing services are located in Phoenix, Tucson, San Antonio, Austin, Las Vegas areas as well as regions in Southern California.

Hospitals and Medical Systems Closing or Laying Off Thousands Across the Nation

There is currently a deluge in the number of US hospitals or health systems that recently announced layoffs or job cuts. Some of these include:

1. Mishawaka, Ind.-based Franciscan Health will lay off 83 employees of its 100-year-old hospital in Hammond, Ind., according to a notice filed with the state.

The layoff notice comes as the health system works to shrink the 226-bed Franciscan Health Hammond Hospital to an eight-bed acute care facility with an emergency department and primary care practice. The layoffs are slated to begin Aug. 21 and will be permanent, the health system said.

2. HealthAlliance of the Hudson Valley, a three-hospital system in the Westchester Medical Center Health Network, laid off an undisclosed number of workers June 14.

Westchester Medical Center Health Network in Valhalla, N.Y., said it laid off HealthAlliance hospital employees in Kingston, N.Y., to eliminate redundancies as it begins to consolidate inpatient services to one location.

3. As part of a financial restructuring plan, Sacramento, Calif.-based Sutter Health will issue another round of layoffs this year. The health system said in early June it plans to lay off 400 employees.

These newly announced layoffs are in addition to 277 information technology jobs that were cut April 2. Sutter said most of the new layoffs affect employees in administrative positions in benefits, human resources, data services and accounting. The layoff notice said many of these employees were working remotely or in the field. 

4. A little over a month after filing a notice to complete about 651 layoffs this year, Ascension Technologies, the IT subsidiary of St. Louis-based Ascension, eliminated 92 remote IT jobs in Indiana, according to a June 3 report. Most of the laid-off employees are based in Indianapolis and Evansville, Ind., the Indiana Department of Workforce Development said June 2.

5. Lawrence (Mass.) General Hospital plans to lay off 56 employees and is warning of more cuts unless it receives government aid quickly, according to a May 25 report. The layoffs will affect employees working in administration and patient care. The layoffs affect about 2.5 percent of the 186-bed hospital’s workforce. Lawrence General attributed the layoffs to the COVID-19 pandemic weakening its financial profile. 

6. Boca Raton, Fla.-based Cancer Treatment Centers of America closed its hospital in Tulsa, Okla. About 400 employees will be affected by the closure. The hospital saw its last patient on May 27. 

7. Boca Raton, Fla.-based Cancer Treatment Centers of America is selling its hospital in Philadelphia and will lay off the facility’s 365 employees, according to a closure notice filed with the state. The cancer care network said it anticipates the layoffs in Philadelphia will begin after May 30.

_______________________

A Special Message From Dodie Dennis (Retired RN)

With 40 years experience as a licensed Registered Nurse on a cruise line, a Colorado ski resort, and in Phoenix, AZ, I did everything from Operating Room to Immunology to all levels of Newborn care.

Among my favorite jobs was teaching childbirth and nutrition classes. For the most part, I believe whole foods trump supplements. And eating a nutritious diet loaded with veggies, grass-fed meat, and plenty of good fats is the starting point. You certainly cannot supplement your way out of poor dietary choices. However, even with the best diet, there may be a few gaps that we might want to fill to “supplement” a solid diet.

For example, Omega-3 fatty acids are vitally important to our health. Our Omega-3 to Omega-6 ratio should be 1:1 or 1:2. Sadly, the average person’s is more like 1:20. Not only are we not getting enough Omega-3 from sources like grass-fed meats and fish/seafood, we’re also over consuming Omega 6 (e.g. vegetable oils, excessive nut consumption) – a double whammy.

Personally, Jack and I don’t eat enough fish to get adequate Omega-3 due to concerns about toxins, mercury, etc. That’s why we welcome a new sponsor to “supplement” with Green Pasture Fermented Cod Liver Oil (FCLO).

Welcome Green Pasture Products to CleverJourneys

I use the word “supplement” loosely here, since FCLO is really a whole food. Not only that, but it’s also a traditional food with a long history of use. Quite the opposite of highly processed fish oils.

Green Pasture’s website

Fermented Cod Liver Oil is simply cod livers fermented naturally to extract the oils. The cold-processing method maintains all the fat soluble vitamins. Most fish oils on the market are heat processed. What’s worse is that they’re then bleached and deodorized, and since most of the vitamins have been removed or destroyed, synthetic vitamins are added back in.

FCLO contains more than Omega 3s. It’s also a great source of Vitamin A and Vitamin D, and contains small amounts of Vitamin K2, Vitamin E, and various other quinones.

If you want to try out the amazing benefits of Fermented Cod Liver Oil, or maybe your current supply is running low, we highly recommend Green Pasture.

Green Pasture’s website
Green Pasture’s website

They are the only company to supply naturally fermented cod liver oil that we are aware of (and the one recommended most highly by the Weston Price Foundation).

Check out Green Pasture’s website now and tell them CleverJourneys sent you.

In addition to Fermented Cod Liver oil, Green Pasture also sells other products like high vitamin butter oil, coconut oil, and coconut ghee.

Green Pasture’s website

Jack likes Green Pasture because they are an American business that share the same patriotic values we do.

Check them out today! God Bless.

Which States Have Banned Proof of Vaccination Requirements?

Fifteen (15) states have prohibited proof-of-vaccination requirements at all or some levels of government: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Montana, South Carolina, South Dakota, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

In 10 of those states, governors banned proof-of-vaccination requirements through executive orders. In the other five, legislators passed laws banning proof-of-vaccination requirements.

Additionally, five states have gone a step further. Alabama, Iowa, Montana, Texas, and Florida have extended bans on proof-of-vaccination requirements to some private businesses.

On the other hand liberal socialist leaning states, New York, Hawaii, and Oregon exempt fully-vaccinated individuals from some COVID-19 restrictions. To avoid the restrictions, they must provide proof of vaccination.

Meme of the Week

Nurse Charged With Felony After COVID Patient’s Death

A nurse in Indiana who is accused of removing the oxygen mask from a 72-year-old nursing home patient who died 8 hours later has been charged with practicing medicine without a license, a felony, according to the IndyStar. 

Connie Sneed, a licensed practical nurse, was charged after another nurse at Wedgewood Healthcare Center in Clarksville, Ind., contacted the facility’s director about a Facebook post written by Ms. Sneed.

“I just want y’all to know the hardest thing I’ve ever done in 28 years start a patient on O2 for 4 days 12 LPM. with a non-rebreather mask,” she wrote, describing the treatment of the nursing home resident, according to USA Today. “I asked him on day 4 if he’s tired he said yes I said do you want me to take all this off for you and let you go and fly with the angels and he said yes.”

The post continued: “I took it all off of him I went in the hallway and I cried and I let him go and he passed away … after I left.” 

Ms. Sneed’s actions led to an investigation by the Indiana Department of Health and the state attorney general. 

“We presented our findings to the Clark County Prosecutor and charges were filed as a result,” a spokesperson for the Indiana attorney general told the IndyStar

Ms. Sneed was fired from Wedgewood May 6, about a week after the alleged incident. The facility’s executive director determined she didn’t obtain a physician’s order to administer oxygen nor to later remove the patient’s oxygen supply, according to the IndyStar. 

If convicted, Ms. Sneed faces a maximum of six years in prison and a fine of up to $10,000. 

Turncoat Mike Pence Just Endorsed Sarah Huckabee Sanders, Public Reaction Not Good

Within one hour after former vice president posted an endorsement for Arkansas gubernatorial candidate Sarah Huckabee Sanders, over 34,000 people responded. Most comments were not favorable to Pence.

_____________________

Click to learn more about the real Mike Pence

“He is known to be bisexual but tries to keep it hidden. He puts forth a persona of über-Christian. When he was governor he was very strict on the gay and lesbian communities, things like this, to hide that. He was surveilled then. And it was well known the FBI and CIA do illegal surveillance of many members of — you know, politicians at all levels.”

Pence Joining Conservative Youth Group Backfires on GOP Establishment, Scott Walker and Others


Young America’s Foundation’s (YAF) latest news release on Friday appears to have backfired on the group that espouses to introduce “young people to conservative ideas through our campus lectures and initiatives, conferences, and various education resources.”

Former Wisconsin Gov. and presidential candidate Scott Walker first announced on his Facebook page that the YAF “are thrilled to have Mike Pence join the Young America’s Foundation as the Ronald Reagan Scholar. He is a full spectrum conservative who will inspire our students.”

Perhaps Walker used the word “inspire” in place of “indoctrinate.”

Over 900 angry people responded within hours negatively through their comments and unlikes to his post. The outrage is growing.

The response to YAF’s page was no better.

Immediately, hundreds of followers chimed in with fu.

Kamala’s Snotty Performance Not Saturday Night Live Skit Worthy

With a sacarastic and whiney performance not worthy of a second-rate Saturday Night Live skit, Kamala Harris proved she was a suitable pick for Joe Biden.

The question, “who is more vice-presidential?” was obvious.

Former Indiana Governor and now Vice President Mike Pence remained diplomatic and steadfast in Wednesday night’s debate.

The sneering California senator discharged hostility and spewed mockery throughout the event. She projected little leadership.

In typical Harris fashion, more than once, her condescending eliteness was exhibited.

She actually told viewers in case they didn’t understand what she was talking about, “then let me explain it to you” (like the average American is too dumb to know what a “bounty” is).

She addressed Americans with “…just so everyone is clear, when we say ‘in debt,’ it means you owe money to somebody.”

Another question wasn’t so obviously revealed. Why would Biden select Harris as his running in the first place?

She’s bad news. Even though she may be George Soros’ pick, she had to drop out of the Democratic presidential primary race finishing 16th place in December 2019.

Even Julian Castro, Marianne Williamson, Corey Booker, John Delaney, Micheal Bennett, Andrew Yang, Deval Patrick, Tom Steyer, Any Klobuchar, Pete Buttigieg and Tulsi Gabbard beat her.

Kelly Mehlenbacher, Harris’ state operations director, resigned because her staffers were being treated terribly. There was minimal direction on policy and Harris lacked a viable plan to win the election.

“This is my third presidential campaign and I have never seen an organization treat its staff so poorly,” Mehlenbacher wrote.

The coffin was nailed during those debates when Representative Tulsi Gabbard revealed that as a district attorney and attorney general, Harris “put over 1,500 people in jail for marijuana violations and then laughed about it when she was asked if she ever smoked marijuana.”

Gabbard finished her off, declaring Harris owed an apology to “people who suffered under your reign as prosecutor.”

Vice President Pence successfully backed Harris into the ropes with challenges about the Green New Deal she and AOC originally sponsored.

She stayed tangled up by not answering Pence’s demanding question that on the minds of millions. Does she and Biden intend to enlarge the Supreme Court if they don’t get their way. And–will they “pack the courts” with liberal justices.

“America, you just heard Sen. Harris tell you, one Day One Joe Biden is going to raise your taxes,” Pence said, warning that Democrats promised to repeal the Trump tax cuts.

One of Pence’s best lines referred to the 1988 plagiarism scandal that wrecked one of Biden’s earlier presidential campaign attempts:

“When you read the Biden plan it looks an awful lot what President Trump, the task force, and I have been doing. It looks a little bit like plagiarism, something Joe Biden knows a little bit about.”

These Wacky American Town Names Will Make You Laugh

Our faith in America’s sense of humor was restored during the pandemic summer of 2020.

We escaped from the onslaught of negative news and propaganda by just getting away. Our travels  through 14 states and Washington D.C. for over a month thoroughly offered a lighter side of truth and experiences.

Besides counting the number of Trump (159) and Biden (0) flags and banners along the way, we got a kick from some of the names and places we saw. Uranus, Missouri,  Santa Claus, Indiana and Hot Coffee, Mississippi were three favorites that come to mind.

To pass some of the highway mile time away, we researched and gathered humorous and fun town names from all 50 states. Here’s are list:

ALABAMA

Screamer, an unincorporated community in southeastern Alabama, may have come from 19th century Native Americans who screamed and  heckled white train travelers as they passed by what was then a reservation. Smut Eye, Alabama is doozie too.

ALASKA

Unalaska has over 4,500 residents, making it the largest city in the Aleutian Islands. Originally, Unangan residents named it Agunalaksh, a word that means “near the peninsula.” Eek, Alaska is noteworthy.

ARIZONA

Why a call a town?” Yes, that’s right “Why” is a small community near the U.S.-Mexico border namhed after the Y-shaped intersection of two nearby highways. But because of an Arizona law requiring place names have at least three letters, “Y” became the much more pragmatic “Why.”

ARKANSAS

Smackover, a town of 1800 people in southern Arkansas, was once a major oil producer. Settled by French trappers in the early 19th century,  “Smackover” may have derived from the French name for a local creek, Chemin Couvert, which means “covered way”—and “sumac couvert” means a covering of sumac trees, a local plant. Goobertown is another fun one

CALIFORNIA

Rough and Ready, California, is named after an old mining company with that same label. It was the first to secede from the Union and become its own “republic” in 1850 as a protest against mining taxes, prohibition mandates, and laws that weren’t enforced. They rejoined the United States three months later.

COLORADO

Colorado has No Name. When government official first marked a newly constructed exit off I-70 with a sign reading “No Name” as a placeholder, it stuck.

CONNECTICUT

Hazardville, Connecticut, was an 1800s industrial village that made gunpowder. The town was named after Colonel Augustus George Hazard, who purchased and expanded the gunpowder company in 1837.

DELAWARE

Corner Ketch is an unincorporated community in New Castle County, Delaware. A rough-and-tumble local bar was known for warning strangers that if they didn’t get you in there, “They’ll ketch ye at the corner.”

FLORIDA

Two Egg, Florida, got its name during the Great Depression. When bartering transactions occurred with two eggs traded, almost like currency, for goods.

GEORGIA

Climax, Georgia sits at the highest point on the railroad between Savannah and the Chattahoochee River.

HAWAII

Volcano, Hawaii sits near the Hilo Volcano and several volcanic hot spots.

IDAHO

Slickpoo, near Culdesac, Idaho, was once a bustling village and site of a Catholic mission. Landowner Josiah Slickpoo donated acreage to the missionaries. Dickshooter, Idaho made us laugh too.

ILLINOIS

Sandwich got its name from Sandwich, New Hampshire.

INDIANA

Santa Claus, Indiana celebrates the spirit of Christmas every day, but especially at the Post Office in December. Gnaw Bone is an interesting name too.

IOWA

What cheer Iowa has in What Cheer, Iowa. It was derived from an old English greeting.

KANSAS

Gas, Kansas is the butt of many jokes. “You just passed Gas.” “Gas Kan.” “Get Gas!” Natural gas was discovered in the area in 1898.

KENTUCKY

Bugtussle is a tiny spot on the Kentucky-Tennessee border is an homage to doodlebugs. Personally, I think Kentucky has some of the best town names with Knob Lick, Bald Knob, Chicken Bristle, Fearsville, Hippo, Krypton, Mud Lick, Monkeys Eyebrow, Pig, and Raccoon.

Bald Knob (guess they licked it too much?), Chicken Bristle, Fearsville, Hippo, Krypton (say hi to Superman’s parents for us!), Mud Lick, Monkeys Eyebrow, Pig, and Raccoon.

LOUISIANA

Uneedus is the settlement site of the Lake Superior Piling Company. Their corporate slogan was “You need us.”  Residents founded another farm community nearby and called it Weneedu.

MAINE

Burnt Porcupine is an island off the coast of Maine.  Located near Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park, Burnt Porcupine has nearby sister islands with equally intriguing names: Bald Porcupine, Long Porcupine, and Sheep Porcupine.

MARYLAND

Boring, Maryland. Enough said.

MASSACHUSETTS

Belchertown wasn’t named for the aftermath of a particularly gassy meal. It’s named after Jonathan Belcher, a colonial governor of Massachusetts.

MICHIGAN

Hell is 15 miles northwest of Ann Arbor. In the 1830s, the town settler, George Reeves, traded homemade whiskey to local farmers for grain. The farmer’s wives said “He’s gone to hell again.”

MINNESOTA

Nimrod, Minnesota is full of nimrods. In the book of Genesis, Nimrod is described as “a mighty hunter before the Lord” and is credited with overseeing the construction of the Tower of Babel.

MISSISSIPPI

Hot Coffee is marked as the midpoint between Natchez, Mississippi, and Mobile, Alabama. A late 1800s inn was erected and capitalized on the spring water, molasses and New Orleans beans used to make hot coffee for weary travelers.

MISSOURI

Although Uranus was our favorite spot in Missouri, Tightwad has a cool name too. There’s also a Cooter and a Licking.

MONTANA

Pray, Montana. And they do. But the town of Pray, Montana, was named for then-state representative Charles Nelson Pray in 1907.

NEBRASKA

Magnet, Nebraska was named by settler B.E. Smith in 1893.

NEVADA

Jiggs, Nevada is about 30 miles south of Elko. It’s named after a top hat-wearing, cigar smoking Irish-American protagonist from an old comic strip Bringing Up Father. A women’s organization in town dubbed itself Maggie’s Club after the character’s wife.

NEW HAMPSHIRE

Sandwich is named after The Fourth Earl of Sandwich, John Montague, who actually invented the sandwich.  In 1763, he chartered the town between the Lakes Region and the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

NEW JERSEY

Loveladies, New Jersey, was named from a nearby island owned by Thomas Lovelady, a local hunter and sportsman.

NEW MEXICO

Candy Kitchen lies between Zuni and Navajo reservations in western New Mexico.  A local moonshine distiller needed a front to hide his illicit operations during Prohibition. To secure the sugar necessary to concoct barrels of hooch, the moonshiner established a confectionery that produced pinion nut candy on the side. Just 85 miles away is Pie Town.

NEW YORK

Neversink, New York is currently sunk under about 175 feet of water. Named for the Neversink River, the longest tributary of the Delaware River, the city of 2000 was a Catskill towns flooded in the 1950s to create reservoirs that would provide water to New York City. It relocated afterwards. But another town, Bittersweet, remains underwater. On land, are towns called Coxsackie and Butternuts.

NORTH CAROLINA

Why not Why Not? That’s the named settled upon when the post office was established in 1860. If not, try Lizard Lick, NC.

NORTH DAKOTA

Cannon Ball, North Dakota gets its name from geological curiosities called concretions. There’s also Zap.

OHIO

Knockemstiff, Ohio. Bar brawls and street fights during moonshine days, prompted the advice from a preacher. When asked by a woman on how to keep her cheating husband home and faithful, the preacher responded simply: “Knock ‘em stiff.” Take that advice however you want.

OKLAHOMA

Gene Autry, Oklahoma was named after the singing cowboy who purchased a 1200-acre ranch nearby that he would turn into the headquarters of his Flying A Ranch Rodeo. On November 16, 1941, the town of Berwyn officially became Gene Autry, Oklahoma. It’s home to a museum and film festival in his honor.

OREGON

Zigzag, Oregon, in the middle of Mount Hood National Forest, is named after the Zigzag River, which drains from the Zigzag Glacier. Notable is

PENNSYLVANIA

Intercourse is in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. “It’s okay, you can giggle!” the village’s website says. “We’re happy with our name. It’s the perfect conversation starter.” About 20 minutes away is the town Blue Ball, named after an 1850s inn.

RHODE ISLAND

Woonsocket is the sixth largest city in Rhode Island ands was originally known as la ville la plus française aux États-Unis, which translates to “the most French city in the United States.”
Historians believe the name is an evolved variation of a word from a Native American language.

SOUTH CAROLINA

Ketchuptown got its name from a country store built by Herbert Small in 1927 were locals went to “catch up” on news and gossip.

SOUTH DAKOTA

Mud Butte was named for a nearby barren butte. In 1981, archeologists digging around unearthed the sixth Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton ever discovered, after a local rancher finally got around to calling a museum about the dinosaur bones he’d seen digging out of a cliff on his property for years.

TENNESSEE

Difficult, Tennessee isn’t too hard to remember.

TEXAS

Muleshoe, Happy, Dime Box, Gun Barrel City, Cut and Shoot, Telephone, Jot ’em Down, Loco, and Comfort were among my favorite town names in Texas until I came upon Ding Dong.  Located in Bell County, the community was named after its founders, the Bell family.

UTAH

Mexican Hat, Utah, has a 60-foot-wide, sombrero-shaped rock formation on the northeast side of town.

SATANS KINGDOM

Satans Kingdom, Vermont is not the only state with that town name. Massachusetts and Connecticut does too. The land was said to be rocky and void of fertile soil.

VIRGINIA

Bumpass, Virginia is pronounced “bump-iss.”

WASHINGTON

Humptulips was a major logging center. The name comes from a local Native American word meaning “hard to pole.” Native Americans used to canoe by propelling themselves along with poles.

WEST VIRGINIA

Lick Fork, Virginia is basically known for photo opportunities with signs bearing that name. There’s more in Booger Hole.

WISCONSIN

Bosstown, Wisconsin takes its name from a William Henry Dosch, a storeowner nicknamed Boss. Wow! There’s also a Spread Eagle.

WYOMING

Chugwater, Wyoming was home of the Mandan tribe, whose chief was reportedly injured during a buffalo hunt and sent his son to lead the hunting party in his place. According to Chugwater’s website, the son determined that the easiest way to kill the buffalo was to drive them off the local chalk cliffs. “The word ‘chug,’” the town’s website notes, “is said to describe the noise that the buffalo or the falling chalk made when it hit the ground or fell into the water under the bluff, depending on which version of the legend you wish to believe. Indians began to call the area ‘water at the place where the buffalo chug.’”

True Things We Didn’t Know About States Until We Visited Them

We left the Texas Hill Country on June 19th on a roadtrip through the South. On our 28th day (We’re in Oklahoma City), we sharing some interesting facts about each state we’ve learned along the way.

Louisiana

Louisiana has the longest coastline (15,000 miles) of any other state in the U.S.

Louisiana makes up approximately 41% of the wetlands in the U.S.

The Lake Pontchartrain Causeway at 23.83 miles in Metairie is the longest continuous bridge over water in the world.

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were ambushed and killed (Bonnie struck 53 times and Clyde struck 51 times) by Louisiana and Texas state police near Bienville Parish, Louisiana. Bonnie was married to another man and never divorced him. The Bonnie and Clyde Ambush Museum in Gibsland, Louisiana, is located a few miles away from their death site.

In 1977, Luisa Harris, the only woman in U.S. history to officially be drafted into the National Basketball Association (NBA), was drafted by the New Orleans Jazz basketball team.

In 2010, the world’s record for the largest pot of gumbo was set by award-winning chef, John David Folse. The pot served 10,000 people. It contained 50 pounds of white crab meat, 85 pounds of oysters, 100 pounds of crab claws, 200 pounds of alligator meat, 450 pounds of catfish, and 750 pounds of shrimp.

Mississippi

In 1963 the University of Mississippi Medical Center accomplished the world’s first human lung transplant and, on January 23, 1964, Dr. James D. Hardy performed the world’s first heart transplant surgery.

In 1902 while on a hunting expedition in Sharkey County, President Theodore (Teddy) Roosevelt refused to shoot a captured bear. This act resulted in the creation of the world-famous teddy bear.

In 1884 the concept of selling shoes in boxes in pairs (right foot and left foot) occurred in Vicksburg at Phil Gilbert’s Shoe Parlor on Washington Street.

Guy Bush of Tupelo was one of the most valuable players with the Chicago Cubs. He was on the 1929 World Series team and Babe Ruth hit his last home run off a ball pitched by Bush.

Root beer was invented in Biloxi in 1898 by Edward Adolf Barq, Sr.

Tennessee

There are more horses per capita in Shelby County than any other county in the United States.

Davy Crockett was not born on a mountaintop in Tennessee, as the song says. He was born on the banks of Limestone Creek near Greeneville, where a replica of the Crockett’s log cabin stands today.

David Crockett

The capitol building was designed by noted architect William Strickland, who died during its construction and is buried within its walls.

Tennessee ranks number one among other states in the total number of soldiers who fought in the War Between the States.

The name “Tennessee” originated from the old Yuchi Indian word, “Tana-see,” meaning “The Meeting Place.”

Coca-Cola was first bottle in 1899 at a plant on Patten Parkway in downtown Chattanooga after two local attorneys purchased the bottling rights to the drink for $l.00.

Cumberland University, located in Lebanon, lost a football game to Georgia Tech on October 7, 1916 by a score of 222 to 0. The Georgia Tech coach was George Heisman for whom the Heisman Trophy is named.

Alabama

In 2004, Chad Fell of Haleyville was certified by the Guinness World Records for blowing the World’s Largest Bubblegum Bubble, Unassisted (without use of his hands) at Double Springs High School in Winston County. He used three pieces of Dubble Bubble gum.

In October of 1989, residents of Fort Payne built a cake to celebrate the city’s centennial. The 12-layer cake was 32 feet wide and 80 feet long and weighed 128,238 pounds. It was certified by Guinness World Records as the World’s Largest Cake.

The country’s first 911 call was made on February 16, 1968, in Haleyville. Alabama Speaker of the House Rankin Fite went to City Hall and called U.S. Representative Tom Bevill, who was at the local police station. The red phone used is on display in City Hall.

The actors who portrayed Goober and Gomer, fictional cousins on the Andy Griffith Show, were both born in Alabama. Jim Nabors, “Gomer,” was born in 1930 in Sylacauga. He died Nov. 30, 2017. George Lindsey, “Goober,” was born in 1928 in Fairfield. He died in 2012.

Virginia

About 1/2 of all the people in the United States live within a 500 mile radius of the Capital of Virginia.

Over 1/2 the battles fought in the civil war were fought in Virginia. Over 2,200 of the 4,000 battles.

The first Thanksgiving in North America was held in Virginia in 1619.

Yorktown is the site of the final victory of the American Revolution.

The first English colony in America was located on Roanoke Island. Walter Raleigh founded it. The colony mysteriously vanished with no trace except for the word “Croatoan” scrawled on a nearby tree.

Mount Mitchell in the Blue Ridge Mountains is the highest peak east of the Mississippi. It towers 6,684 feet above sea level.

Washington D.C.

Herbert Hoover and John Quincy Adams had pet alligators in the White House.

To date, nobody has beat Jimmy Carter’s record of watching 480 movies in the White House movie theater.

Washington DC is missing “J” Street. It uses letters for streets traveling east to west. But numbers are also used for streets. I was told it’s because “J” and “I” look too similar on street signs.

There’s a crypt under the Capitol building that was made for George Washington. Although he was not buried there, the crypt still exists; they also had a viewing chamber built so people could go by and see him.

John Adams was actually the first president to live in the White House. George Washington never lived there; it was built after he died.

There are 35 bathrooms in the White House. There are also 132 rooms and 6 levels in the residence. Even more staggering are the 412 doors, 147 windows, 28 fireplaces, 8 staircases and 3 elevators.

There’s only one U.S. president buried in Washington D.C. Woodrow Wilson is entombed at Washington National Cathedral.

Missouri

The first successful parachute jump to be made from a moving airplane was made by Captain Berry at St. Louis, in 1912.

The most destructive tornado on record occurred in Annapolis. In 3 hours, it tore through the town on March 18, 1925 leaving a 980-foot wide trail of demolished buildings, uprooted trees, and overturned cars. It left 823 people dead and almost 3,000 injured.

At the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, Richard Blechyden, served tea with ice and invented iced tea.

Also, at the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904, the ice cream cone was invented. An ice cream vendor ran out of cups and asked a waffle vendor to help by rolling up waffles to hold ice cream.

The Arch has foundations sunken 60 feet into the ground, and is built to withstand earthquakes and high winds. It sways up to one inch in a 20 mph wind, and is built to sway up to 18 inches.

The most powerful earthquake to strike the United States occurred in 1811, centered in New Madrid, Missouri. The quake shook more than one million square miles, and was felt as far as 1,000 miles away.

During Abraham Lincoln’s campaign for the presidency, a dyed-in-the-wool Democrat named Valentine Tapley from Pike County, Missouri, swore that he would never shave again if Abe were elected. Tapley kept his word and his chin whiskers went unshorn from November 1860 until he died in 1910, attaining a length of twelve feet six inches.

Situated within a day’s drive of 50% of the U.S. population, Branson and the Tri-Lakes area serves up to 65,000 visitors daily. Branson has been a “rubber tire” destination with the vast majority of tourists arriving by vehicles, RVs and tour buses. Branson has also become one of America’s top motor coach vacation destinations with an estimated 4,000 buses arriving each year.

Indiana

The first professional baseball game was played in Fort Wayne on May 4, 1871.

Santa Claus, Indiana receives over one half million letters and requests at Christmas time.

Deep below the earth in Southern Indiana is a sea of limestone that is one of the richest deposits of top-quality limestone found anywhere on earth. New York City’s Empire State Building and Rockefeller Center as well as the Pentagon, the U.S. Treasury, a dozen other government buildings in Washington D.C. as well as 14 state capitols around the nation are built from this sturdy, beautiful Indiana limestone.

In 1934 Chicago Gangster John Dillinger escaped the Lake Country Jail in Crown Point by using a “pistol” he had carved from a wooden block.

Comedian Red Skelton, who created such characters as Clem Kadiddlehopper, and Freddie the Freeloader, was born in Vincennes.

Arkansas

Alma claims to be the Spinach Capital of the World, but Texas knows Crystal City really is.

A person from Arkansas is called an Arkansan.

The state contains six national park sites, two-and-a half million acres of national forests, seven national scenic byways, three state scenic byways, and 50 state parks.

North Carolina

The Venus Fly-Trap is native to Hampstead.

The first miniature golf course was built in Fayetteville.

Babe Ruth hit his first home run in Fayetteville on March 7, 1914.

North Carolina has the largest state-maintained highway system in the United States. The state’s highway system currently has 77,400 miles of roads.

West Virginia

On January 26, 1960 Danny Heater, a student from Burnsville, scored 135 points in a high school basketball game earning him a place in the Guinness Book of World Records.

Nearly 75% of West Virginia is covered by forests.

Outdoor advertising had its origin in Wheeling about 1908 when the Block Brothers Tobacco Company painted bridges and barns with the wording: “Treat Yourself to the Best, Chew Mail Pouch.”

Bailey Brown, the first Union solider killed in the Civil War, died on May 22, 1861, at Fetterman, Taylor County.

The first brick street in the world was laid in Charleston, West Virginia, on October 23, 1870, on Summers Street, between Kanawha and Virginia Streets.

Oklahoma

Boise City, Oklahoma was the only city in the United States to be bombed during World War II. On Monday night, July 5, 1943, at approximately 12:30 a.m., a B-17 Bomber based at Dalhart Army Air Base (50 miles to the south of Boise City) dropped six practice bombs on the sleeping town.

Sooners is the name given to settlers who entered the Unassigned Lands in what is now the state of Oklahoma before the official start of the Land Rush of 1889.

The world’s first installed parking meter was in Oklahoma City, on July 16, 1935. Carl C. Magee, of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is generally credited with originating the parking meter. He filed for a patent for a “coin controlled parking meter” on May 13, 1935.

During a tornado in Ponca City, a man and his wife were carried aloft in their house by a tornado. The walls and roof were blown away. But the floor remained intact and eventually glided downward, setting the couple safely back on the ground.

Bob Dunn a musician from Beggs invented the first electric guitar in 1935.

Oklahoma has more man-made lakes than any other state, with over one million surface acres of water.

Kentucky

Cheeseburgers were first served in 1934 at Kaolin’s restaurant in Louisville.

Chevrolet Corvettes are manufactured in Bowling Green.

Mammoth Cave is the world’s longest cave and was first promoted in 1816, making it the second oldest tourist attraction in the United States. Niagara Falls, New York is first.

The song “Happy Birthday to You” was the creation of two Louisville sisters in 1893.

Daniel Boone and his wife Rebecca are buried in the Frankfort Cemetery. Their son Isaac is buried at Blue Licks Battlefield near Carlisle, where he was killed in the last battle of the Revolutionary War fought in Kentucky.

Boone Gravesite

The public saw an electric light for the first time in Louisville. Thomas Edison introduced his incandescent light bulb to crowds at the Southern Exposition in 1883.

The radio was invented by a Kentuckian named Nathan B. Stubblefield of Murray in 1892. It was three years before Marconi made his claim to the invention.

Joe Bowen holds the world record for stilt walking endurance. He walked 3,008 miles on stilts between Bowen, Kentucky to Los Angeles, California.

Miscellaneous

The most fun Dodie and I have experienced so far was riding the mile long Branson Sawmill Coaster. We were able to control the speed of our individual coaster pods.

I Don’t Believe in News, I Believe in You

We drove through downtown St. Louis, Missouri yesterday to check out the Gateway Arch. We didn’t feel welcome for the first time on this trip. Trash, urine, tents, and people who looked drugged out and not too bright were welcomed though. The local city government is doing a horrible job. I wonder which political party controls St. Louis?

For the last 20 days I’ve been doing a great deal of listening…and I mean a lot!

We elected to drive to a southwestern suburb location and stayed at the clean and beautiful Wildwood Hotel about 1/2 hour away. Many homes in this well maintained and manicured area proudly display American flags.

Tired and weary from fake and propagandized news, we’ve elected to stay away from it. On our 2020 roadtrip, we’ve learned far more by listening to ordinary folks than predictably biased political pundits. 

Corky’s BBQ in Memphis.

America is even more beautiful than I imagined. Remember how many of us came together, waving our flags and bowing our heads, after the terrorism of September 11, 2001?

Being on the road has not only been an encouraging respite, but it’s turned out to be an eye opening reality check of the strength and character of our citizens. 

Accustomed to flying to and from cities during my career days, there wasn’t much time for many road trips except in Texas.

I’ve given speeches and presentations in NY, LA, Chicago, Orlando, Vegas, Philadelphia, Nashville, San Diego, Dallas, Vegas, Monterey and Monterrey. But there was little time to explore.

Lucky for me, Dodie shares a love of roadtripping, so we took off as soon as we could. Last week we celebrated our 7 month anniversary in D.C. and West Virginia.

If there is one solid thing I can take from this trip, it’s that belief in traditional values of Americans is strong.

By Dodie’s count we’ve seen 77 Trump vs. 0 (ZERO) Biden flags and signs since we left Texas on June 19th. Even in D.C. we expected there would be some for Biden. But there were none.

Near the Lincoln Memorial, by the Arts of World Sculptures, entering the Arlington Memorial Bridge, I talked briefly with three university students while Dodie was finding a restroom.

One male was from Georgetown University and the two coeds attended Howard University nearby. It was Friday, July 3rd and the area was filled with joggers, skaters, bicyclists and walkers. I asked several questions: why traffic was so light? Do they have concerns about protests?  What’s the mood of students right now? Why no Biden signs anywhere?

The succinct answers: 

1. bureaucrats left for July 4th holiday.

2. protests are contained in their normal location north of the White House near La Salle Park. It’s not the big deal mainstream media make it out to be.

3. many students are as fed up with the pandemic, distorted news, and false reasons for protests as most Americans are.

The male, African-American, with courtesy, answered my last question with a question.

“Does it appear as if the Democratic National Committee does not wish to spend money on him?”

I almost fell over stunned and stumbled to reply.

“Well, I just don’t know,” is all I could reply, then explained we had only seen Trump signs and flags from Texas to here.

The front desk manager at the Hyatt Place in Chantilly, Virginia, just outside of Washington D.C., said they don’t play anything but FOX News on their lobby TV because “we were getting too many complaints about CNN.”

At the Civil Rights Museum and Lorraine Motel, we stood next to friendly, decent people–Black, Indian and Hispanic–to pay our respects to Martin Luther King, Jr. in the rain. We smiled and wiped our tears together. It was solemn, but we were with each other.

In a Shoney’s Restaurant in Sevierville, Tennessee, our server Ruth, went on a friendly tirade about how bad the media is.

“Watching them, you’d think everyone in the world hates President Trump,” she said. “But everyone I talk to here loves him. And I’m talking about people coming in from all over the United States. People are sick of this nonsense and it’s going to backfire on them. What they (media) say and what I see are far different.”

A couple in their 40s, sitting near us at a Texas Roadhouse restaurant in Chantilly, Virginia were practically repeating what Ruth said in Tennessee. The wife asked her husband if she knew anyone voting for Biden.

“No one who will admit it,” he laughed. Then, with all seriousness said, “The only way Democrats can win is by cheating and fraud. That’s why they’re pushing for mail in voting.”

Dining in Emzara’s Restaurant at the Ark Encounter in Williamstown, Kentucky, a Georgia man, perhaps 35, proudly wore a “TRUMP 2020” T-shirt in the dining room. I had to ask.

“Oh I’m thinking I’m around God loving people here,” he grinned as we bumped fists.

Another man, about 50, walked up to say “Hi” and pointed to his very own MAGA (Make America Great Again) red ball cap.

“Looks like we’re on the same team,”  he said and tipped his cap.

Over our plates of Dodie’s chicken and dumplings and my meatloaf at a Vicksburg, Mississippi Cracker Barrel, the topic of conversation of two couples sitting at tables across from us was similar.

“I don’t believe the news anymore.”

“Oh me too. We just turn them off.”

“Their dishonesty is so obvious, only an imbecile would still believe them.”

We’ve tried to analyze this phenomenon along the way. We travel rural and urban roads and highways.

We stay near universities, tourist attractions or remote locations (ever heard of Corinth, Kentucky?).

When feasible, we favor mom and pop restaurants over chains: North Star Cafe, Mellow Mushroom Pizza, Marlowe’s, Johnnie’s Drive In, and D’Cracked Egg for instance.

Our server, Brian (but nicknamed “Flash” according to the badge his regular local customers made for him) at a Bob Evans restaurant in Charleston, West Virginia, had plenty to say about politics. It was as if he had been conversing with server Ruth in Sevierville.

“Biden can’t even talk right, much less run a country,” he was riled. “Ever’ body ’round here is voting for Trump.”

In D’Cracked Egg in Tupelo we overheard a group of locals expressing the same sentiments as so many others.

Mt. Airy, North Carolina–AKA Mayberry–had the largest number of Trump and American flags of any city.

Yesterday morning,  I walked in a small gas station-store combination and sat down for about 20 minutes listening to the breakfast and coffee regulars near Corinth, Kentucky. It was the same: Trump all the way.

Moments ago at a rest stop on IH-64 West in Illinois, I saw a young man, perhaps 25, wearing a MAGA cap. He was polite and opened the door to the Visitors Center for me.

“Thank you kind Sir,” I responded. “I like your cap.”

“Well thank you too,” he smiled. “I’m proud to wear it.”

What we’ve seen and heard is not what we’ve expected. Having a moratorium on mainstream news has opened our eyes. We can think better, have very little anxiety about politics, and have greater faith in America…even more so than ever in our lives.

With our own eyes, traveling through 10 states (and D.C.), we see, hear, and sense that the vast majority of Americans are good and decent people. Red and Yellow, Black and White, they are fed up and willing to protect their freedoms, traditions, history. 

Storming Santa Claus

There was a fierce storm in Santa Claus.

“It’s a hateful rain,” proclaimed Dodie as we traveled farther away from Louisville as fast as we possibly could.

Earlier we stopped in Frankfort, Kentucky to pay our respects at American frontiersman Daniel Boone’s gravesite. He’s buried next to his wife Rebecca at one of the most beautiful locations we’ve ever seen.

Living in today’s society, I have to constantly remind myself not to think of things the way they are now. In fairness, and in honesty, it’s important to allow the characteristics and customs of past generations to be what they were. It’s not for me to judge or speculate based on their mores.

The marriage of Daniel Boone and Rebecca Bryan proved remarkably resilient, despite so many challenges of their times.

They lived through the perils of Indian attacks, the squalor of frontier settlements, frequent and large financial reverses, repeated moves over thousands of miles, the killings of two sons by Indians, and Boone’s recurrent and prolonged absences on long hunts and military campaigns.

The Boones were originally buried near Marthasville, Missouri just west of St. Louis, but in 1845 both bodies were disinterred and moved to Frankfort Cemetery. He died on September 26, 1820 at age 85.

As I sat at their tomb, my mind considered the same thing it did at burial site of Meriweather Lewis (of Lewis and Clark expedition fame) a week ago. Leave our nation’s monuments alone. Preserve our heritage and history.

Peacefully overlooking the Kentucky River and the State Capitol Building, we paused for awhile to thank God for our journeys and the privilege to live in America.

Fellow McCollum High School alumnus Richard Dean suggested we tour the Louisville Slugger Museum while we went through Louisville. We added it to our list, along with the Muhammad Ali Center (constructed for $80 million and opened in 2006).

Have you ever had that instinctual feeling in the gut that tells you not to do something? I always follow my instinct (not worry or doubt, I’m talking about sheer instinct). I followed it in Louisville. Something was wrong and I told Dodie I’d like to get out of there.

Not a minute later, driving on West Jefferson Street we saw this beautiful white statue of King Louis (city’s namesake) had been grossly vandalized and spray painted. Mark us down as two more would be tourists leaving their city immediately.

Later I found out Slugger bat museum was closed on Tuesday and Wednesday. In addition, we learned three idiots were arrested for the King Louis statue vandalism that occurred at 5 a.m. in front of the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office.

Antonio Harris, Jordan Novak and Nahtaeya Cronford (Source: Louisville Metro Corrections)

Forget Louisville. We moved west on I-64 towards Santa Claus.

That’s right, the one and only Santa Claus, Indiana, a town founded in 1854.

I saw it on the map the night before and thought I’d surprise Dodie with a stopover. The weather was turning bad quick, so I mentioned the town to her. She looked it up and read it to me as I drove through the rain that was just beginning to hit us.

“In 1856, when the town was working to establish a post office, the Post Office Department refused their first application as there was already a Sante Fe, Indiana established with the Post Office Department. Several town meetings were held, during which the name Santa Clauswas selected.”

The town has the world’s only post office to bear the name of Santa Claus.

“Because of this popular name, the post office receives thousands of letters to Santa from all over the world each year.”  

Suddenly lightning lit the skies in brilliant cracks. Darkness squeezed the foggy sky and siezed every tree, every square inch of ground. Thunder declared its supremacy and sheets of rain poured on our windshield faster than the wipers could swipe.

That’s when Dodie proclaimed, “That rain! It’s hateful.”

Immediately in front of us, about 40 yards, a semi-truck started a quarter spin on the slick highway. The credible driver was able to prevent a serious wipeout and at that very moment we saw a blue sign: “Rest Area Right.”

We exhaled simultaneously in relief. I maneuvered into a safe parking spot and remained there for a good half hour. But it was a long 30 minutes plus of high winds shaking the car as “hateful” rain pelted the roof and windows.

“Why do they call this the Hoosier State?,” I asked.

While Dodie looked it up, I began writing this blog article.

“There was once a contractor named Hoosier employed on the Louisville and Portland Canal who preferred to hire laborers from Indiana,” she read from the State’s government site. “They were called “Hoosier’s men” and eventually all Indianans were called Hoosiers.”

Now you know the best of the story.

Santa Claus Post Office