America

Article V, US Constitution Growing in Favor by More States to Restrict Federal Government

What do Texas Gov. Greg Abbott, Sen. Rand Paul, Ben Carson, Sarah Palin, Sen. Jim DeMint, Gov. Mike Huckabee, Sean Hannity, Steve Hilton, Ben Shapiro, Charlie Kirk, Mark Levin, Louie Gohmert, and Allen West have in common (besides being censored by Big Tech websites)?

They all endorse using Article V of the United States Constitution to reign in Deep State operatives and the abuses of power by federal government.

The Convention of States Project is a national effort to call a convention under Article V of the United States Constitution.

The intent is to propose amendments that will impose fiscal restraints on the federal government, limit its power and jurisdiction, and impose term limits on its officials and members of Congress.

Americans want to bring power back to the states and the people, where it belongs. Unelected bureaucrats in Washington, D.C. shouldn’t be allowed to make sweeping decisions that impact millions of Americans. But right now, they do. So it all boils down to one question: Who do you think should decide what’s best for you and your family? You, or the feds?

WHAT’S A CONVENTION OF STATES ANYWAY?

Article V of the U.S. Constitution gives states the power to call a Convention of States to propose amendments. It takes 34 states to call the convention and 38 to ratify any amendments that are proposed. The convention would only allow the states to discuss amendments that, “limit the power and jurisdiction of the federal government, impose fiscal restraints, and place term limits on federal officials.”

Once 34 states apply for a convention to propose amendments on the same issue (i.e., limiting the power and jurisdiction of the federal government), Article V requires Congress to name the place and the time for the convention. If it fails to exercise this power reasonably, either the courts or the states themselves can override Congressional inaction.

States are free to develop their own selection process for choosing their delegates—properly called “commissioners.” Historically, the most common method used was an election by a joint session of both houses of the state legislature. 

Delegates discuss and propose amendment proposals that fit the topic framed by the 34 state resolutions that triggered the convention. All amendment proposals the convention passes by a simple majority of the states will be sent back to the states for ratification.

Each state has one vote at the Convention. If North Carolina sends seven delegates and Nebraska sends nine, each state must caucus on each vote. North Carolina’s one vote would be cast when at least four of its delegates agreed. Nebraska’s vote would be cast by the agreement of at least five of its delegates.

Current status

The ratification process ensures no amendments will be passed that do not reflect the desires of the American people. In addition to this, there are numerous other safeguards against a “runaway convention.” 

Citizens for Self-Governance (CSG) is the parent organization of the Convention of States Project. CSG provides the resources and experience necessary to make this project a success. The CSG mission is as follows: “Self-governance must be restored across America. Citizens for Self-Governance will elevate awareness and provide resources, advocacy, and education to grassroots organizations and individuals exercising their rights to govern themselves.” CSG sees the COS Project as a means to accomplish this mission.

http://www.conventionofstates.com

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