My First Big Interview Was With Elvis Presley

In the early spring of 1976, my Southwest Texas State University (now Texas State) journalism professor Jeff Henderson, asked his class on the second floor of Old Main to write down the names of two people we would like to interview if we could. 

When he called on me to reveal my answers, embarrassingly, I said “Elvis Presley and Clint Eastwood.”

Spontaneously, my classmates laughed. Their answers were reasonable…and safe: the police chief, fire marshal, county commissioner, etc. But Jeff held his hand up and looked me seriously straight in the eyes and asked, “Why don’t you?”

WHY DON’T YOU?

“Look, Jack. You just came back from winning Investigative Reporter of the Year Award out of every university in the Rocky Mountain Collegiate Association,” he smirked, then grinned. “So, my question to you is—why don’t you?”

I thought of scores of reasons why I couldn’t. Jeff’s question would have profound impact the rest of my life. So, why don’t I? Within eight months, I interviewed both Presley and Eastwood.

I traveled to Memphis during Spring Break with one mission in mind: To do the impossible by interviewing Elvis.

Just a few days after my arrival, staying at a nearby (from Graceland) Howard Johnson’s, I was called in by a local radio station to be interviewed myself because there was much buzz (was that even a word, other than the sound a bee makes, in ’76?) about Elvis.

It was recently announced he’d be performing in his hometown later that summer. Months away and thousands of fans had been camped out for two days in line to buy tickets.

The day before, I drove by the Mid-South Colosseum and was astonished. People were in tents, sleeping bags, lawn chairs and on blankets waiting. Although it was hot and humid, they were happy.

Through the years I’ve found dedicated Elvis fans to be among the happiest people on the planet. Their camaraderie expands beyond man-made limiting boundaries such as race, politics, religion and sex. Generally, they’re united.

Two nights before, I gained quick notoriety among Memphis fans for gaining the “impossible dream.” I scored an interview with Elvis Presley!

As a young journalism student from then Southwest Texas State, I did my homework. The stars were aligned:

🔹Local fans were not swarming around Graceland,

🔹It was a time sandwiched between Elvis’ mother Gladys’ birthday week (reasoned he may leave to visit her gravesite) and Mother’s Day. Yes, it was a long shot, but I was giving it all I could.

🔹With donuts, coffee and burgers from the Hickory Log cafe, I befriended Elvis’ cousin Harold Loyd and other Graceland gate security guards at night…and Uncle Vester Presley, Charlie Hodge and others during the day in between naps (Elvis was a night owl, so I had to be).

Harold Loyd

.

🔹The big card up my sleeve was the ace in the hole: I was President of the Texas Chapter of the official Elvis Presley Graceland Fan Club.

Invited to the radio station because of the spike in interest of the upcoming concerts and me landing the interview, the DJ began asking questions in rapid fire.

I answered them as fast as he spit them out, but when he paused for a commercial break, I defaulted to my normal mode of operation–to engage in conversation rather than his Q&A approach.

Elvis’ Bicentennial Harley.

.

He started taking live listener calls. It was compelling enough that he kept me on air for over an hour.

I was psyched, of course, but somehow all this excitement calmed my youthful ego. I was very thankful for meeting Elvis, but especially grateful for his kindness. When you hear or read how nice he was to fans, believe me, it was very genuine kindness.

Shaking the hand of the man my parents, my sister Bobbi and I would see on the giant screens of the Trail or Mission Drive-In theaters, watch on TV, or read about in magazines and newspapers, was a surreal and humbling experience.

Meeting Elvis taught me much, including the value of doing homework, being prepared, investigation and a more engaging approach to interviewing.

Most of all, it taught me to never let self-imposed obstacles get in the way of my dreams.

Photos of Dodie and me taken at Graceland, SUN Studio, on June 24, 25 2020.

The following August, I was able to meet Elvis briefly backstage at Hemisfair Arena in San Antonio to present him some official honorary documents from the City, Bexar County and a Texas-shaped award from fans across the state.

Two of my favorite journalism classmates under Jeff Henderson, Janis Johnson and Vicky Highsaw, joined me on the front row center section for the Elvis concert.

Photos taken from front row, center at Elvis Presley’s August 18, 1976 concert.

Thanks for supporting independent true journalism with a small tip. Dodie & Jack

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History, Texas, Pioneers, Genealogy

From award-winning Texas author Cynthia Leal Massey.

The Most Fundamental Lesson Good Writers and Bloggers Must Know

It was fun interviewing and meeting performers (Elvis Presley, Willie Nelson, Clint Eastwood, Freddie Mercury, Kenny Loggins, Jim Messina, and Jackson Browne, to name a few).

In journalism school at Southwest Texas State (now Texas State) University, I started out as University Star Fine Arts Assistant Editor my sophomore year.

Especially rewarding were lessons I took away from writing reviews of concerts, theatrical performing arts, books and art. Committed to learning all I could to hone writing skills, I paid particular attention to Journalism and English professors who endured my thirst for knowledge in and out of class.

One of the more prominent lessons was the “Three Act Narrative.” Today, we have the Internet, but I wouldn’t trade the value of learning from brilliant teachers and good ol’ trial and error.

In screenplay writing, I’ve learned movie plots go by a formula called “The Hero’s Journey.” However, in practically every story you’ve ever read or seen has more in common than you think.

What if I said that a bloodcurdling horror movie with zombies and a Shakespeare play has the same building blocks? Sounds bizarre, doesn’t it? But it won’t be once you understand what narrative structure is.

Plot vs Narrative

You may have heard of the word plot and the word narrative, but they are not one and the same.

🔹‘Plot’ refers to the summation of events in any given story.

🔹 ‘Narrative’ refers to the way the plot is structured and presented to the reader.

Detective novels involve the investigation recounting what actually happened in the mystery. While the plot would involve these details regardless of where they appear in the text, the narrative offers the reader clues along the way and saves the big reveal for the end.

By cursory glance, the structure may seem inconsequential. But in truth, the narrative is what makes every story satisfying.

As readers, we love to piece together the details of any story ourselves before its revealed at the end. We also love when the writer peppers foreshadowing throughout the novel, as it makes the ending that much more satisfying. Even twist endings make sense in some way. But why is that?

This is because of a concept most writers use called the three-act structure. The concept is simple; your story can be divided into three, clearly defined or not, acts, each serving a different purpose. At its simplest, a story must have a beginning, middle and end. But how the writer structures these three has a large impact on how the story itself is read.

Shakespeare’s Globe Theater

Act I: The first act has all to do with the setup. Also known as the expository act, this part of the story establishes everything we, the reader, need to know.

Where is this story set? If it’s not a real-world setting, what are the rules by which the universe operates? Who is our main character? What are their strengths? What are their weaknesses? What is the main conflict our hero must overcome? These are all questions the first act must answer.

The first act also features an ‘inciting incident’ that sets the story in motion and slowly builds towards a major plot point.

Act II: The second act starts right after the first major ‘incident’ in a novel. In The Wizard of Oz, this would be when Dorothy reaches Munchin Land for example, and the first major plot point was Glenna the Good Witch telling her to “follow the Yellow Brick Road.”

The second act’s role is to build towards the big climax by adding additional details that will become relevant later and include a second major plot point. Some novels may even feature a ‘midpoint’ – this is where the protagonist is at their lowest or the farthest from achieving their goals.

Act III: The third act packs the biggest punch of all – the climax. But before the climax, there must be something called a pre-climax. This is the part where the protagonist is working towards the climax in which they face their primary conflict head-on.

In The Wizard of Oz, this would be the lessons learned along the way with Scarecrow, Tinman and the Cowardly Lion to be overcomed before Dorothy confronts the Great and Powerful Wizard.

The third act is usually the shortest act in any novel because it moves so fast. Following the climax, the novel quickly offers a resolution that wraps everything up.

Freytag’s Pyramid

The 19th-century German writer Gustav Freytag adapted the three-act structure into what is now known as Freytag’s pyramid.

According to Freytag:

🔹‘Rising action’ is where the stakes are continuously raised and the key to building a satisfying climax.

🔹‘Falling action’ is when the big conflict is conquered and the story either winds down for a resolution or resets for a sequel, as is the case with most children’s books.

The name ‘three act structure’ comes from the fact that most dramas, especially dramas in ancient Greece as well as most of Shakespeare’s play years later, followed the three-act structure almost religiously.

Aristotle, in his seminal work ‘poetics’, where he explains the mechanics of what makes a good story, explains the important way to keep a story moving is its “cause and effect beats”. Every scene in a story must feed into the scene that happens next and not seem like standalone episodes.

The three-act structure is especially important in cinema, which must fit a remarkable amount of plot points, rising action and character growth into two hours or so.

Alfred Hitchcock

Screenplay writers rely on the three-act structure to help them pace their movie in a way that keeps the audience engaged as well. The three-act structure really took off in the film industry after Syd Field’s pioneering book ‘Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting. This book has served as a reference for some giants in the industry like James Cameron, Steven Spielberg and Clint Eastwood and in writing their own movies too.

The three-act structure has become so prevalent that it has also influenced the way TV shows are written. You may have noticed that when your favorite television show ends on a cliffhanger, the next season quickly resolves the cliffhanger so it can move on to building up the story again.

A narrative that is just as intense throughout the story with no build rarely has a satisfying ending. So what these TV show creators are doing is something like a soft reset. They are slowly building conflict again so that the season finale can be the most exciting point in the season.

Once you realize the basics of the three-act structure, it’s not that hard to spot. Whether it’s in books, movies, or TV shows, the three-act structure is everywhere.

A common topic of discussion in our family after watching a movie or seeing a play include questions like Where did the writers go wrong? Was there not enough exposition? Was there too much exposition? Did they drag out the middle?

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From award-winning Texas author Cynthia Leal Massey.

What I Learned About Happiness From Interviewing Famous People

From Elvis Presley to B.B. King to Buzz Aldrin to Clint Eastwood and so many more, I had the pleasure and opportunity visit with some of the most influential people of our times. I always asked questions about happiness.

by Jack Dennis

Rudy Giuliani

Rudolph Giuliani is best known for being mayor of New York during the September 11, 2001 attack. In 2008, I had the opportunity to meet Giuliani in San Antonio. The American leader expressed his thoughts on his personal change, compassion, hope and faith during the disaster.

“Most people are surprised to know that I changed more from having prostate cancer than from September 11,” Giuliani stated, backstage at the Alamodome, where he was to give a speech later. “Dealing with the cancer forced me to gain the wisdom about the importance of life and the lack of control we have over death.”

“I needed the confidence and character I gained from coping with the cancer to prepare me to deal with, and even survive, the trials of September 11,” the former mayor said.

Giuliani found himself surrounded by firefighters, police officers and emergency workers on that fateful day in 2001. The worst attack on American soil became the most successful rescue operation in our country’s history under his leadership.

That evening, as Giuliani prepared for bed, he found solace in the words of Winston Churchill and “realized that courage doesn’t simply materialize out of thin air.”

Giuliani attended hundreds of funerals and visited Ground Zero daily.

“I grew physically and emotionally exhausted,” he recalled. “When I saw the families of the victims, I was revived knowing if they can do this, I can do it.”

“Courage begins years before, sometimes in our early childhood, as we develop our character,” he spoke. “Every choice we make in life can strengthen or weaken our character.”

Here are highlights of Mr. Giuliani’s views.

“When I was in my teens, I seriously planned to become either a priest or a doctor as I have always been faithful and enthusiastic about my faith in God and helping others. Religion was a favorite topic I enjoyed talking with my teachers about. Prayer and faith in God provided me with the strength I could not acquire from any other source. When things are tough, it’s always a good idea to pray for the guidance and strength necessary to get us through.”

“Most of my time as mayor was spent under the maxim that it’s better to be respected than to be loved. September 11 unlocked compassion in me that I typically reserved for my family and very close friends. I discovered that revealing your love and compassion does not weaken leadership. It makes it stronger.”

“Allowing doubt, fear and worry to overtake us is an inevitable path to failure. I could not afford failure after September 11. It was very necessary to reach inside and push the doubts away, and even out, of my thinking.”

“I’ve spent much of my reading on learning about how great leaders that I admired grew up and forged the character each had to deal with different substantial challenges. Churchill and Franklin Roosevelt came to mind. ‘Then only thing we have to fear is fear itself.’”

“Love can spark deep moments of profound goodness. When I saw the love of our heroes in New York who looked beyond their own safety or what was best for themselves and focus on the lives and safety of others, I learned that love can help us push aside differences to share our humanity and those things that we have in common.”

“I prayed with these brave men and women. I became very close and was able to learn from these firefighters, police officers and emergency responders, not to mention ordinary every day civilians. At the root of all of this, it was love, and not so much the sense of duty, that caused those firefighters to run into the flaming towers to save those he or she had never met. Love can so powerful it can help us be kind to even those who are cruel to us.”

Jerry Lewis

Jerry Lewis, “one of the 5 most recognizable people in the world,” according to Newsweek magazine was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize in 1977 for his efforts and results with the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

The “King of Comedy” died August 20, 2017 at age 91. Millions know him for helping the Muscular Dystrophy Association in 1950 and helped raise more than $2 billion for almost 60 years.

He teamed up with Dean Martin at age 19 to launch their careers to the top of the movie charts and worldwide stardom. 

 In 2008, I had the opportunity to meet Lewis in San Antonio. The American comedian, actor, and director expressed his thoughts on happy and the key to success in life before he went on stage to address a crowd of 18,000 people in the Alamodome.

“No one gets through life unscathed,” Lewis told the audience. “Pain, rejection and sorrow have been obstacles in life, but they have also been a source of inspiration.”

“My parents were performers on the road and were never home, so relatives raised me. I missed them so much,” he recalled. “Comedy, and being the center of attention and making people laugh, began as a means to fill the emptiness. It became my life.”

“At first I didn’t know what I was doing,” Lewis laughed. “I kept going on and I found the key and that was to squelch the fear!”

“Don’t let fear rob you of opportunities,” he pointed up. “Take risks. There is no limit to what you can do, but you have to take that first step past fear. You can make it work for you.”

Here are highlights of Lewis’s views, both backstage and onstage:

I had met Jerry Lewis briefly behind the Majestic Theater in San Antonio in January 1995 where he was performing the play ‘Damn Yankees.’ It was after a matinee show, his throat was hurting and his voice was hoarse to the point he had to be relieved of showing up for the evening performance.

He was staying at the La Mansion hotel on the River Walk just across the street from the theater but was unable to meet. It was a pleasure to get to go backstage at the Alamodome years later and talk with this great American entertainer.

Lewis had been watching the monitors backstage to see those going on before him onstage. Dressed in a back suit, with a red shirt and handkerchief in his front pocket, Lewis smiled from his electric mobility scooter as I approached. (Note: I had just won a dance contest by process of elimination from the audience crowd roar among 21 contestants. The prize? A free trip to Walt Disney World for my family.)

“Mr. Energy, come shake my hand,” he offered his hand to me. I was exhausted and happy to win, but especially excited to meet him. He laughed when I asked what was his key to happiness in life.

Looking at me square in the eyes, Jerry Lewis grabbed my arm with his right hand and pointed to me with his left. He was serious. Then smiled again.

 “The key to happiness and maintaining joy in your life is easy,” he grinned. “Do you remember when you were nine-years-old?”

He paused.

“If you can remember that time and always be the person you were when you were nine, you will have a happy life.”

“Applying that same sense of humor, the childlike humor of a nine-year-old, as I see it, is the secret to getting through life and getting the most out of it,” Lewis explained. “Laughter is healing. Many doctors now know that it is the truth that laughter is a terrific safety valve.”

“When I see how serious people are, it becomes automatic for me that I must stop this seriousness,” Lewis spoke. “Immediately, I become mischievous and do whatever I can and whatever it takes to lighten the mood.”

“The smiles and laughter that follow make me happy and make me know and remember I’m doing exactly what I was put on this earth to do.”

Jerry Lewis’s legacy includes more than 60 films (including 18 he wrote, directed and starred in), concerts, radio, television, and standup performances since age 5.

Interviewing Others

Over the years I made it a habit to always ask the question, “What makes you happy?”

If they answered and had the time, I would ask for elaboration. I didn’t always get it and some where reluctant to pursue that line of questioning. The biggest surprise was from Merle Haggard (I will write about later). But here are some notable personalities who were enthusiastic about the subject of happiness.

The age they were when I asked them.
Jerry Lewis83“…remember when you were nine-years-old? Always be the person you were when you were nine.”
Elvis Presley41“Knowing and appreciating what God has blessed me with.”
Gene Krantz72“Always reach for the stars.”
May Pang60“John said it best: IMAGINE.”
Clint Eastwood46“Working hard, and long enough, to pay my dues and earn the right to do what I want to do.”
B.B. King85“Well, Son, it music of course. Singing and playing.”
Buzz Aldrin76“Continuing to learn and continuing to have opportunities to apply what you learn.”

The Most Popular News Articles of 2020

We are sincerely thankful for the patronage and readership of so many followers around the world.

When Dodie and I began CleverJourneys in May 2020, we came loaded with experience. My first big interview was with Clint Eastwood in 1974. I was fresh out of high school and very motivated after scoring that opportunity.

When I decided to return to writing 12 years ago, it was obvious that print media and journalism in general were lying and dying. Little did I realize it was worse than I thought.

I wrote over 2,100 articles for Examiner, but their Colorado editors kept censoring me. I learned their workshifts and would post conservative articles when certain leftist editors were not there.

Within a year I became the top Texas “Examiner” and remained in the Top 5 position (often #1 of the week) in the United States until AXS Entertainment bought Examiner out.

Soon I was interviewing celebrity singers touring Texas such as George Strait, B.B. King, Kenny Rogers, Merle Haggard, George Jones and writing news, history and reviews for AXS and The Rowdy.

For several years I wrote for them and started NewsLegit.com until a competitor bought me out. I had to wait a year before I could start a new site per the agreement. Over time, I learned much about the blogging business.

As newlyweds in December 2019, Dodie brought along a keen eye for detail and the wisdom of 38+ years as an RN. She’s absolutely smart and the best copy editor I’ve ever worked with.

We started out hoping to get 25 hits a day. On a good day we’d see a hundred. Steadily we found our niche (Dodie calls it “our groove”). As we roadtripped the United States during the pandemic summer, we learned so much about what Americans–decent citizens–were thinking and doing. It was not even close to what the media and Hollywood portrayed.

This helped us considerably find our groove…and success.

With 11 years of building relationships and credible sources in government, politics, law enforcement, military, civil service and yes, in entertainment, we built our readership to hundreds and then thousands a day. Recently we surpassed the 9,600 views an hour record—that’s over 160 hits a minute.

We couldn’t do it without each of you. From the bottom of our hearts, thank you.

In case you missed them, here is our first official countdown of the ten most read CleverJourneys articles of the year. Little did any of us know what we were all in for during 2020. God Bless and thank you again.

#1.

$400 Million Via Swiss Bank Account Sent to Dominion From Chinese Government Tied Firm Before Election

Did the sons of former Vice President Joe Biden and longtime Massachusetts state Senate President Billy Bulger aid in stealing U.S. Military secrets to China?

#2

Michigan Secretary of State Faces Serious Election Fraud Allegations Due to Lies Proven by Forensic Investigation

The forensic audit of election Dominion Voting System has proven Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson lied in her public statements and on her office’s official website about the integrity and certification of the state’s 2020 election.

#3

Pelosi Has Suspicious Ties With Election Software ‘Glitch’ Company in Favor of Biden Ballots

The company with all the voting machines that “glitch” to create more votes for Biden is “Dominion Voting Systems.”

Their DC lobbyist is Nancy Pelosi’s longtime aide. The company hired Brownstein Farber Hyatt & Schreck earlier this year. Nadeam Elshami, Pelosi’s former chief of staff, is one of the lobbyists on the account.

#4

Secret Germany Raid Reveals CIA Ties to US Election Fraud

More intelligence and reports are coming out to help Americans connect the dots of the election fraud carried out by Deep State operatives.

This information could also explain why Defense Secretary Mark Esper was terminated by President Donald Trump last week.

We know that Dominion and SmartTech are two companies that have played a roll in manipulating vote ballot fraud in key swing states in the 2020 U.S. presidential election. These are foreign companies.

#5

Trump WILL Win Due to Evidence and the U.S. Constitution Says So

A CIA Data Analyst Officer, stationed at the Frankfurt, Germany secret cyber farm raided by U.S. Special Forces last month, has indicated President Donald J. Trump won the 2020 election legitimately.

Officer Mathew Billings has lawyered up after he was terminated from his position while attempting to relay data, documents, and what he witnessed to the media.

#6

Criminal Sympathizers to BLM Thugs In Memphis Disgrace Elvis Presley’s Graceland Wall

Fans from around the world are demanding to know how disrespectful thugs were allowed to criminally deface the historical wall and sidewalk in front of Graceland in Memphis, Tennessee.Photo: Billy Stallings

Knowing the value of Elvis Presley’s mansion, questions are being directed at Elvis Presley Enterprises and local government how security could be so lax to permit the vandalism.

Presley, who was raised and grew up in Black neighborhoods of Tupelo, Mississippi, was known for his kindness and unracial love for Blacks.

#7

George Soros and China’s Active Plan to Use Biden-Harris to Take Over America is Now Exposed

George Soros and his Open Society  fellow Democracy Alliance billion-millionaire partners directly funded the corrupt campaign of Joe Biden and the Democrats more than any other entities.

He is the largest single contributor to Antifa, Black Lives Matter and Disrict Attorneys across the United States. He literally controls many Democrat and Republican politicians. His tentacles even reach some liberal minded judges.

#8

COVID Beliefs Blown Away For RVers-Campers on Iconic U.S. Travel Roads

We have just returned from a 32-day, 4500 mile roadtrip (June 19-July 21) from the Texas Hill Country through much of the South, Washington D.C. for July 4th, to part of the Midwest and back.

Our preconceived ideas from news and the continually changing regulations around COVID-19 were blown away with the reality we experienced. It actually restored our faith in the goodness of America.

#9

How the Democrats plan to oust President Trump even if he is reelected.

Will Donald J. Trump be America’s last president?

If most Americans were familiar with what the French term “coup d’etat” means, they would likely understand the question.

I first heard of it many years ago (1970s) while researching and interviewing people regarding the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

#10

Is Donald Trump America’s Last True President?

The Secret, Behind the Scenes Government Force Set Up by the Democrats is Ready to Take Over

The Reality Is Blatant

Most Americans can sense something is seriously wrong. It appears so horrific that some can’t believe it’s actually happening.

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Clint Eastwood Was Right About Hollywood Punks, He Made My Day

It took 3,048 days to write this article. Just to be certain, with all the patience one could muster, I wanted to be absolutely certain. Looking back all those 99 months or 72,950 hours ago, with 100 percent confidence and credence, I can make the following statement:

Clint Eastwood’s was right when he spoke at the Republican National Convention on Aug. 30, 2012. 

Eastwood August 30, 2012.

Eastwood, looking at an empty chair as if he was talking to Barack Obama, said, “You’re crazy, you’re absolutely crazy.  You’re getting as bad as Biden. Of course we all know Biden is the intellect of the Democratic party. Kind of a grin with a body behind it.”

It drew one of the loudest applauses of the night. Even then, America knew Biden was a joke, and there could never be a legitimate reason he could come close to being president.

For many Americans, that date was the beginning of the end for Hollywood and the propaganda media.

The legendary macho icon was right again when he decided to defy a Hollywood boycott against and filmed his 2019 movie Richard Jewell on location in Georgia.

Immediately after his 2012 speech, left wing media pundits and the liberal Hollywood machine attacked.

But others in the non-Hollywood, non-propaganda media part of the entertainment business, praised him.

CNN wrote that Eastwood’s speech “sparked laughs, criticism and confusion as he carried on a conversation with an empty chair, harping its ‘occupant,’ President Barack Obama, for four years of what he called failed policy and bad politics…”

I had high hopes for Eastwood being able to conquer the China controlled Hollywood elite after his speech. In the 1970s, I was honored to interview him between Thunderbolt and Lightfoot and the Eiger Sanction films and remain a devoted fan.

Jack Dennis after interviewing Eastwood in the 1970s.

Despite the Tinseltown press and mainstream media attacks, Eastwood went on to make more remarkable movies including Jersey Boys (2014), American Sniper (2014), Sully (2016), The Mule (2018), and Richard Jewell.

Today Eastwood remains the most daring conservative in Hollywood. The now 90-year-old star of cinema classics like The Good, The Bad and the Ugly and Dirty Harry is still going strong.

While the Chinese owned AMC Theaters and the same movie industry that gave us Harvey Weinstein, Kevin Spacey and Rob “Meathead” Reiner wither away, our hero Eastwood continues to buck every hissy fit they can muster.

Here are some highlights from Eastwood famous speech that night.


   I know what you are thinking.  You are thinking, what’s a movie tradesman doing out here?  You know they are all left wingers out there, left of Lenin.  At least that is what people
think.  That is not really the case. There are a lot of conservative people, a lot of moderate people, Republicans,
Democrats, in Hollywood.  It is just that the conservative people by the nature of the word itself play closer to the vest. They do not go around hot dogging it.

 So — but they are there, believe me, they are there.  I just think, in fact, some of them around town, I saw John Voigt, a lot of people around.
  
   John’s here, an academy award winner.  A terrific guy.
These people are all like-minded, like all of us.


 I remember three and a half years ago, when Mr. Obama won the election. And though I was not a big supporter, I was watching that night when he was having that thing and they were talking about hope and change and they were talking about, yes we can, and it was dark outdoors, and it was nice, and people were lighting candles. They were saying, I just thought, this was great.


Everybody is trying, Oprah was crying.

I was even crying.  And then finally — and I haven’t cried that hard since I found out that there is 23 million
unemployed people in this country.


   Now that is something to cry for because that is a disgrace, a
national disgrace, and we haven’t done enough, obviously — this
administration hasn’t done enough to cure that.  

Whatever interest they have is not strong enough, and I think possibly now it may be time for somebody else to come along and solve the problem.


 (Looking at the empty chair)
  So, Mr. President, how do you handle promises that you have
made when you were running for election, and how do you handle them?


I know even people in your own party were very disappointed when
you didn’t close Gitmo.  And I thought, well closing Gitmo — why close that? We spent so much money on it… I thought maybe it was just because somebody had the stupid idea of trying terrorists in downtown New York City.

I know you were against the war in
Iraq, and that’s okay.  But you thought the war in Afghanistan was OK.
You know, I mean — you thought that was something worth doing.  We didn’t check with the Russians to see how they did it. They did there for
10 years.


 You’re crazy, you’re absolutely crazy.  You’re getting as bad as Biden. Of course we all know Biden is the intellect of the Democratic party. Kind of a grin with a body behind it.


  I never thought it was a good idea for attorneys to the president, anyway. I think attorneys are so busy — you know they’re always taught to argue everything, and always weight everything — weigh both sides…They are always devil’s advocating this and bifurcating this and bifurcating that.  You know all that stuff.

But, I think it is maybe time — what do you think — for maybe a businessman.  How about that? A stellar businessman.  

Two conservative Hollywood legends. James Woods and Clint Eastwood.


 I would just like to say something, ladies and gentlemen. Something that I think is very important.  It is that, you, we own this country. We own it.  It is not you owning it, and not politicians owning it.  Politicians are employees of ours.


 And  — so — they are just going to come around and beg for votes every few years.  It is the same old deal.  But I just think it is important that you realize , that you’re the best in the world. Whether you are a Democrat or Republican or whether you’re libertarian or whatever, you are the best.  And we should not ever forget that. And when somebody does not do the job, we got to let them go.