Clever Hacks

From Atlas Rockets to Protecting the Statue of Liberty: 40 Ways to Use WD-40

Herd It Through the Grapevine #6

Long before WD-40 was a household name and a can resided in practically every home across America, it was an obscure product invented for a singular purpose.

Back in 1953, Norman Larsen, founder of the Rocket Chemical Company, created WD-40 for the Convair aeronautical company to protect the SM-65 Atlas missile–the American military’s first operational intercontinental ballistic missile.

In order to reduce its weight, the Atlas had a very thin steel skin and even thinner steel balloon-style fuel tanks. It was critical to protect the skin and the paper-thin steel fuel tanks from corrosion and WD-40 accomplished that task by both displacing water molecules on the metal and penetrating into the pores of the metal surface.

Although the SM-65 Atlas missile was briefly put into service, as a nuclear missile platform it was, thankfully, never deployed as such. After retirement as a military missile system in the mid 1960s, the de-weaponized Atlas system had a long and fruitful career as NASA’s launch platform of choice–sending countless satellites, the Mercury missions, and the Gemini missions into space.

Although we know that WD-40 is comprised of compounds like hydrocarbons and petroleum, the formula of WD-40 is a trade secret and the product was never patented in order to avoid disclosing the formula.

WD-40 Uses

‘Water Displacement’ Compound.


1.      Protects silver from tarnishing.


2.      Removes road tar and grime from cars.


3.      Cleans and lubricates guitar strings. 


4.      Gives floor that ‘just-waxed’ sheen without making them slippery.


5.      Keeps the flies off of Cows, Horses, and other Farm Critters.


6.      Restores and cleans chalkboards.


7.      Removes lipstick stains.


8.      Loosens stubborn zippers.


9.      Untangles jewelry chains.


10.    Removes stains from stainless steel sinks.


11.    Removes dirt and grime from the barbecue grill.


12.    Keeps ceramic/terracotta garden pots from oxidizing.


13.    Removes tomato stains from clothing.


14.    Keeps glass shower doors free of water spots.


15.    Camouflages scratches in ceramic and marble floors.


16.    Keeps scissors working smoothly.


17.    Lubricates noisy door hinges on both home and vehicles doors.


18.    It removes that nasty tar and scuff marks from the kitchen
flooring. It doesn’t seem to harm the finish and you won’t have to
scrub nearly as hard to get them off.  Just remember to open some
windows if you have a lot of marks.


19.    Removes those nasty bug guts that will eat away the finish
on your car if not removed quickly!


20.    Gives a children’s playground gym slide a shine for a super fast slide.


21.    Lubricates gearshift and mower deck lever for ease of handling on riding mowers.


22.    Rids kids rocking chair and swings of squeaky noises.


23.    Lubricates tracks in sticking home windows and makes them easier to open.


24.    Spraying an umbrella stem makes it easier to open and close.


25.    Restores and cleans padded leather dashboards in vehicles, as well as vinyl bumpers.


26.    Restores and cleans roof racks on vehicles.


27.    Lubricates and stops squeaks in electric fans.


28.    Lubricates wheel sprockets on tricycles, wagons and bicycles for easy handling. 


29.    Lubricates fan belts on washers and dryers and keeps them running smoothly.


30.    Keeps rust from forming on saws and saw blades, and other tools.


31.    Removes grease splatters from stove-tops.


32.    Keeps bathroom mirror from fogging.


33.    Lubricates prosthetic limbs.


34.    Keeps pigeons off the balcony (they hate the smell).


35.    Removes all traces of duct tape.


36.    Folks even spray it on their arms, hands, and knees to relieve
arthritis pain. (See picture above).


37.    Florida’s favorite use is: ‘cleans and removes love bugs from grills and  bumpers.’


38.    The favorite use in New York: it protects the Statue of Liberty from the elements.


39.    WD-40 attracts fish. Spray a little on live bait or lures and you
will be catching the big one in no time. Also, it’s a lot cheaper than
the chemical attractants that are made for just that purpose.   Keep
in mind though, using some chemical laced baits or lures for fishing are not allowed in some states.


40.    Use it for fire ant bites. It takes the sting away immediately and stops the itch. 


41.    It is great for removing crayon from walls. Spray it on the marks
and wipe with a clean rag.


42.    Also, if you’ve discovered that your teenage daughter has washed
and dried a tube of lipstick with a load of laundry, saturate the
lipstick spots with WD-40 and rewash. Presto! The lipstick is gone!


43.    If you spray it inside a wet distributor cap, it will displace the
moisture, allowing the engine to start.


44. Ants don’t like it.

_______________________

A Special Message From Dodie Dennis (Retired RN)

With 40 years experience as a licensed Registered Nurse on a cruise line, a Colorado ski resort, and in Phoenix, AZ, I did everything from Operating Room to Immunology to all levels of Newborn Care.

Among my favorite jobs was teaching childbirth and nutrition classes. For the most part, I believe whole foods trump supplements. And eating a nutritious diet loaded with veggies, grass-fed meat, and plenty of good fats is the starting point. You certainly cannot supplement your way out of poor dietary choices. However, even with the best diet, there may be a few gaps that we might want to fill to “supplement” a solid diet.

For example, Omega-3 fatty acids are vitally important to our health. Our Omega-3 to Omega-6 ratio should be 1:1 or 1:2. Sadly, the average person’s is more like 1:20. Not only are we not getting enough Omega-3 from sources like grass-fed meats and fish/seafood, we’re also over consuming Omega 6 (e.g. vegetable oils, excessive nut consumption) – a double whammy.

Personally, Jack and I don’t eat enough fish to get adequate Omega-3s due to concerns about toxins, mercury, etc. That’s why we welcome a new sponsor to “supplement” with Green Pasture Fermented Cod Liver Oil (FCLO).

Welcome Green Pasture Products to CleverJourneys

I use the word “supplement” loosely here, since FCLO is really a whole food. Not only that, but it’s also a traditional food with a long history of use. Quite the opposite of highly processed fish oils.

Green Pasture’s website

Fermented Cod Liver Oil is simply cod livers fermented naturally to extract the oils. The cold-processing method maintains all the fat soluble vitamins. Most fish oils on the market are heat processed. What’s worse is that they’re then bleached and deodorized, and since most of the vitamins have been removed or destroyed, synthetic vitamins are added back in.

FCLO contains more than Omega 3’s. It’s also a great source of Vitamin A and Vitamin D, and contains small amounts of Vitamin K2, Vitamin E, and various other quinones.

If you want to try out the amazing benefits of Fermented Cod Liver Oil, or maybe your current supply is running low, we highly recommend Green Pasture.

Green Pasture’s website

They are the only company to supply naturally fermented cod liver oil that we are aware of (and the one recommended most highly by the Weston Price Foundation).

Check out Green Pasture’s website now and tell them CleverJourneys sent you.

In addition to Fermented Cod Liver oil, Green Pasture also sells other products like high vitamin butter oil, coconut oil, and coconut ghee.

Green Pasture’s website

Jack likes Green Pasture because they are an American business that share the same patriotic values we do.

Check them out today! God Bless.

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